News - June 2021 Edition 2

Important:

Clients should not act solely on the basis of the material contained in this newsletter. Items herein are general comments only and do not constitute or convey advice per se. Also changes in legislation may occur quickly. We therefore recommend that our formal advice be sought before acting in any of the areas.

This newsletter is issued as a helpful guide to clients and for their private information. Therefore it should be regarded as confidential and not be made available to any person without our prior approval.  

Please contact us if you wish to discuss how the points raised in this edition specifically affect you.

ATO's taxable payments reporting system update

The ATO has confirmed that more than 60,000 businesses have not yet complied with lodgement requirements under the taxable payments reporting system ('TPRS') for 2019/20.

The TPRS is a black economy measure designed to assist the ATO to identify contractors who don’t report or under-report their income.

The ATO estimates that around 280,000 businesses need to lodge a Taxable payments annual report ('TPAR') for the 2020 financial year.

Importantly, 2020 was the first year that businesses that pay contractors to provide road freight, information technology, security, investigation, or surveillance services may need to lodge a TPAR with the ATO (in addition to those businesses providing building and construction, cleaning, or courier services).

Businesses who have not yet lodged need to lodge as soon as possible to avoid penalties.

ATO Assistant Commissioner Peter Holt added that some businesses may not realise they need to lodge a TPAR, but may be required to, depending on the percentage of payments received for deliveries or courier services.

“Many restaurants, cafés, grocery stores, pharmacies and retailers have started paying contractors to deliver their goods to their customers. These businesses may not have previously needed to lodge a TPAR. However, if the total payments received for these deliveries or courier services are 10% or more of the total annual business income, you’ll need to lodge,” Mr Holt said.

Warning regarding new illegal retirement planning scheme

The ATO has recently identified a new scheme where SMSF trustees were informed that they could set up a new SMSF to roll-over the fund balance from the old SMSF and then liquidate their old SMSF, in an attempt to avoid paying potential tax liabilities.

The ATO warns that taking part in this arrangement and others like it can result in civil and criminal actions and could ultimately put the members' retirement savings at risk.

If a trustee of an SMSF believes they have been approached by a promoter of a retirement planning scheme, the ATO recommends they seek a second opinion from a registered tax agent or appropriately qualified financial adviser, and also report the promoter to the ATO.

New succession planning guide for family businesses

The Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, in conjunction with Family Business Australia, has released a new online guide to succession planning — the “Introductory Guide to Family Business Succession Planning” — which provides a step-by- step guide to passing the family business on to the next generation.

A recent report revealed that 54% of family businesses have no documented succession plan in place and no retirement plan for the current CEO.

The easy-to-read guide offers tips on how to handle tense conversations that can arise between family members throughout the transition phase.

The guide is free and available on both the Family Business Australia and the ASBFEO’s websites.

Please Note: Many of the comments in this publication are general in nature and anyone intending to apply the information to practical circumstances should seek professional advice to independently verify their interpretation and the information’s applicability to their particular circumstances.